Category Archives for "SEO"

The Insanely Powerful 2018 SEO Checklist (Updated)

ClickMinded is an awesome SEO training course.

Every time we start a new site, we use this SEO checklist. There are a number of things you should be doing every time you create a new page. This list covers the most important ones.


How to Get a Perfectly Optimized Site With the 2018 SEO Checklist

Use the checkboxes to track your progress as you complete these tasks.

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This SEO checklist, and on-page optimization in general, is best thought about as incrementally beneficial. The big mistake people tend to make is that they find a checklist, they go through everything on it, and the minute they realize they won’t be able to do one of them, they think they’re screwed.  That’s not the right way to think about it.

Try to do as many as you can – but the vast majority of people aren’t able to get everything.


Why should you do this?

Google Analytics is the most widely used web analytics tool in the world. Its free version has almost everything you’ll need to track and report the performance of your site.

For SEO, you’ll be able to track things like how much traffic you’re getting from search engines, which pages are getting the most organic traffic, what’s the bounce rate, along with many other important metrics.

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Previously known as Webmaster Tools, Search Console is a free tool provided by Google to webmasters (those who manage a website) to get data about their site’s status and organic performance in Google’s search engine.

Resources:


Why should you do this?

This is the equivalent to Google’s Search Console for Microsoft’s search engine. Bing is the default search engine for Internet Explorer and Edge browsers, which is the reason why Bing has about 10% of market share for desktop searches.

Bing is not nearly as relevant as Google, but it’s also not negligible in the US market.

Resources:


Why should you do this?

These plugins are a perfect answer for tracking and interpreting performance data when you aren’t comfortable with adding the Google Analytics tracking code to your site yourself.

Resources:


Why should you do this?

Yoast SEO is a WordPress plugin that makes it incredibly easy for you to create SEO-friendly content. It takes care of things like canonical tags, noindex tags, and sitemaps for you.

The free version is very complete and will allow you to do almost everything you’ll to optimize your WordPress site.

Resources:


Why should you do this?

Previously known as Webmaster Tools, this is Google’s free tool for website owners to get data about the search performance of their sites.

You will be able to use it to find technical issues with your site such as duplicate content. And find data about search rankings, visibility, and CTR.

Resources:


Why should you do this?

In SEO, the proper use of redirects in crucial. The standard is a 301 redirect, which is interpreted by search engines as a permanent redirect, hence it passes almost all of the SEO value from the old page to the new one. A 302 is a temporary redirect, on the other hand, is considered a temporary redirect (like for site maintenance or time-specific promotions, for example) so the SEO value of the redirected page is not passed to the new destination.

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Why should you do this?

The larger your site, the more important this is. Broken links, errors, and crawl errors make it harder for search engines to find your content, index it, and drive traffic to it.

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Why should you do this?

Understanding the terms that people use when they search, and the intent behind them is crucial to your SEO strategy.

Be sure to consider searcher intent and difficulty, pick 1 keyword per page, and you’ll generally want to start with lower-volume keywords first.

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Why should you do this?

This is the easiest way to get started with link building. Tracking where they are getting their most authoritative backlinks will help you to understand their strategy, how they are anchoring the links on their pages, and provide insights as to where you can gain similar links.

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Why should you do this?

Keywords in the URL are known to be a ranking signal. However, you should avoid stuffing your URL with keywords: research has shown that shorter URLs tend to rank higher than long ones.

Side note: There are very serious consequences to changing a URL that already has authority – don’t do this if your page already has links!

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Why should you do this?

Even though including keywords in the title tag is still important, it is not enough to get you to rank high. Search engines now weigh in the clickthrough rate on the results as well when determining rankings, so an attractive and compelling title will help you get more people to click on your page.

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Why should you do this?

The content of the meta description is not used by search engines as a ranking signal. However, including your keyword in it and writing a compelling meta description can help with your CTR.

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Why should you do this?

Even though the value of the H2, H3,...,H6 tags for SEO is debatable, it is still generally a good idea to include your primary keyword in your H1 tag, make sure there is one H1 in the entire page and that it appears before any other heading tag.


Why should you do this?

Make sure to have at least 100 words on each URL (minimum – the more the better). You can still rank with less, and you don’t ever want to put unnecessary text on your site, but I recommend not creating a new page unless you have roughly ~100 words worth of content.


Why should you do this?

As search engines gain a more complex understanding of human language, content creators are able to utilize more natural language and still stay relevant to the keywords they are trying to rank for. Synonyms are great, and using natural language that’s influenced by keyword research (rather than just pure keywords) is highly encouraged.

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Why should you do this?

Latent semantic indexing, or LSI, is a method used to determine context. Including keywords that are thematically related to your primary keyword can help the search engine understand what the content of your page is about.

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Why should you do this?

Search engines “see” images by reading the ALT tag and looking at file names, among other factors. Try to be descriptive when you name your images.


Why should you do this?

In addition to including links to relevant and authoritative sites in your content, Google looks at the language used in the hyperlink itself. By including internal links with text that is relevant to the page that you are linking to, and including your keywords, you are indicating what the content being linked is about.

Avoid using keywords in global navigation, though, as that can look like over-optimization. Stick to in-content links instead.

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Why should you do this?

Duplicate content can dilute the value of your content among several URLs.

Use 301 redirects, canonical tags or use Google Webmaster Tools to fix any duplicate content that might be indexing and penalizing your site.

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Why should you do this?

Search engines value sites that provide a good user experience and the speed of your site is a huge factor. A slow loading site will increase your bounce rate, as visitors lose patience and leave.

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Why should you do this?

As an increasing amount of web traffic comes from mobile devices, having a site that is not responsive to different screen sizes and shapes will negatively impact usability, especially for local searches.

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Why should you do this?

An XML sitemap helps search engines understand the structure of your site and find all the pages on your site that you want indexed.

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Why should you do this?

In conjunction with an XML sitemap, a robots.txt file will establish what activities crawlers are permitted to perform in relation to each page. Including one in the top-level directory allows you to control the way that a search engine crawls and indexes your site. It can be specified for different types of crawlers, allowing you to establish different protocols for different search engines.

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Why should you do this?

For reputation management reasons, not only do you want to make sure no one else gets your account name, but you can often own all the results on the first page of a search for your brand if you’re a new website or company.

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Why should you do this?

Performing an SEO audit manually is time consuming and complicated. Fortunately, there are SEO auditing tools that can help with the process. These will speed up the process, identifying errors and offering solutions. This allows you to spend more of your time working on overall strategy, instead of weeding out broken links.

Resources:

 
 

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  • January 2, 2018
  • SEO

The 31 Best Free & Paid SEO Tools For 2018 (Updated)

The tools you use can legitimately make or break your SEO campaign. By using faster, more effective SEO tools, you really can make a measurable impact on your SEO efforts. We talk about this a lot in the ClickMinded SEO training course. Not going to lie: there are a lot of SEO tools out there, it is quite a jungle. Here are our favorite SEO tools for 2018.

Keyword Research / Competitive Analysis

KWFinder.com

My personal favorite – the #1 keyword research tool in the industry. Creates a “competitiveness” score that is super helpful, and shows where your competitors are ranking for each keyword

SEM Rush

Fantastic data on rankings, competitive analysis, keyword research and more. Arguably the best tool in the industry.

KeywordTool.io

A great tool that uses autocomplete data to find more keywords in your vertical.

Keywords Everywhere (Chrome Plugin)

A great tool that shows you Google Adwords Keyword Planner search volume data every time you do a search! Super helpful for uncovering valuable new opportunities by accident.

SEO Quake (Chrome Plugin)

SEMRush’s chrome plugin. Overlays super useful data right into the search results.

Google Adwords Keyword Tool

This used to be the defacto starting point for your keyword research in SEO, however Google has really started to limit the functionality. You now only get “range” data if your paid search campaign budget isn’t high enough. This tool is much more effective if you have a bigger paid search budget. If you don’t, use some of the other keyword research tools we recommend.

Google Trends

Google Trends is a great additional tool to check query volume on a relative basis.
 
Link Building

Ahrefs

My personal favorite. The best link analysis tool in the industry. Their link database seems to be the largest, and the way you can cut the link data is extremely comprehensive.

Majestic SEO

Another link analysis tool. My second favorite tool in the link building industry.

Link Research Tools

Another link analysis tool.

Open Site Explorer

Another link analysis tool.
 
Technical Tools

Redirect Path (Chrome Plugin)

A simple tool that shows you the redirect page a search engine takes on any page.

OnCrawl 

A free crawl path optimization tool

Browseo.net

See how search engines view your site with Browseo. This is great for diving into how Google and other search engines view your site. It’s particularly helpful with identifying redirect chains, and 302 redirects that should be 301s.

BuiltWith

This will show you a number of things going on behind-the-scenes with competitor websites. Server information, CMS systems, frameworks, analytics and tracking etc. Not necessarily directly helpful, but can help uncover valuable information.

Screaming Frog

A fantastic tool for crawling your site and understanding the myriad technical problems that are inevitably happening. Screaming Frog crawls your website just like Google does, and tells you exactly what you need to fix.

Xenu

Find broken links and errors with Xenu. While Screaming Frog is significantly better and has a lot more functionality (it’s actually kind of crazy to even compare the two), this one is free.

Google Page Speed Tools

Google’s tool which shows you exactly what you need to fix in order to speed up your site.

Gift Of Speed

Another page speed testing tool

GTMetrix

Another page speed testing tool

Miscellaneous

Google Chrome

This recommendation will seem funny to most people – but yes there are still some people trying to do SEO with Safari or Firefox! I highly recommend using Google Chrome. From developer tools to a massive ecosystem of SEO plugins, you really should be using Google Chrome if you’re serious about SEO.

LinkClump (Chrome Plugin)

A simple plugin that lets you grab multiple links at once and open them up all at the same time.

User-Agent Switcher (Chrome Plugin)

Let’s you view pages as any user agent (great for testing responsive design).

LinkGrabber (Chrome Plugin)

Extracts all the links on a page and gives it to you in an easy-to-use copy and paste format.

Yoast SEO

The single best WordPress SEO plugin.

No-Follow Checkbox

A simple tool that makes it easy to no-follow links in WordPress

Google Tag Assistant (Chrome Plugin)

An easy way to see if your Google tags are installed correctly. Google Analytics The non-optional Definitely the most valuable analytics package out there. World-class enterprise grade analytics for free. The first thing you should install.

Google Search Console

This one isn’t optional folks. You have to install Google Search console in order to ‘communicate’ with Google about your site.

Google’s Structured Data Testing Tool

Use this tool to check how Google views your structured data markup.

ClickMinded SEO Certification

Learn more about the ClickMinded SEO Individual Qualification.

 

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  • January 2, 2018
  • SEO

How to Add Remarketing to a WordPress Site

There are many ways to add your Google remarketing pixel to your WordPress site. There are probably more eloquent ways to do it than this. Here is one quick and dirty way to do it.

  1. Sign in to Google Adwords: https://adwords.google.com
  2. Click “Shared Library” on the left sidebar
  3. Under “Audiences” click “view”
  4. Click the red “Remarketing List” button near the top
  5. Select “Website visitors” from the drop-down menu
  6. Enter a campaign name
  7. In “Who to add to your list”, select “Visitors of a page with a specific tag”
  8. Select “New tag”
  9. Adjust the duration of the cookie or “Membership duration”
  10. After hitting save, you’ll get your remarketing code
  11. Copy the code

This is your Adwords Remarketing tag! Now let’s add it to your site via a wordpress plugin

  1. Login to your site
  2. Go to Plugins –> Add New
  3. Search for “Google AdWords Remarketing”
  4. It has 10,000+ installs and looks like this: Screen Shot 2015-06-17 at 4.23.52 PM
  5. Once installed, go to “Settings” and then “Google Adwords Remarketing”
  6. Paste your code in, and hit save.
  7. Visit your website, and check if it’s installed with Google Tag Assistant
  8. If the tag says it’s there, but it’s “blue”, don’t worry about it, it’s just a plugin conflict and you’re fineScreen Shot 2015-06-17 at 4.26.35 PM
 

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  • January 2, 2018
  • SEO

Powerful SEO Checker & Website Analysis Tool (Free)

Free SEO Checker Page Analysis Tool

 We’ve mentioned this tool in the ClickMinded SEO training course. Perform an SEO check of your website and receive an analysis of on-page optimization ranking factors for any page. Enter a URL and a primary keyword to get started.

The tool will give you feedback on a number of things, including:

  • Site speed test, including time to load, size, and number of requests.
  • Analysis of your URL.
  • Title and meta description analysis based on your primary keyword
  • SEO checker for images determines if you’re using the right file names and ALT tags.
  • Visualization of the most used words on the page.
  • SEO audit of your heading tags, page copy, and code.
  • Analysis of social media metrics for the page and root domain.
  • Mobile-friendliness diagnosis.
  • Outbound and backlink analysis of the page and root domain.
  • High-level SEO check of your root domain.

After reviewing all of the items above, the ClickMinded SEO Checker & Website Analysis tool will provide you with a checklist of on-page optimizations you can start implementing right away.

 

 

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  • January 2, 2018
  • SEO

The Complete Guide to Link Building (Updated)

Link Building 2017

Before getting into some of the link building tactics, here’s a quick refresher on why building links helps our search engine rankings. This is all covered in the ClickMinded SEO training course and the ClickMinded SEO Certification.

  1. Off-page optimization (or link building), is arguably the single most important aspect of SEO.
  2. A link from Site A to Site B is like a “vote” from Site A for Site B
  3. There are essentially 3 factors when it comes to link building (in order of importance): Contextual relevance, authority, and quantity

Contextual relevance, as well as the trust/authority of the domain you’re getting the link from, are very important.

For awhile, all anyone ever cared about was PageRank, named after Larry Page and now a patent owned by Stanford University, which assigns a “weight” value to a webpage. It’s still important, but just one factor among many in the ranking equation.

I strongly recommend getting the book The Search by John Battelle. It’s a comprehensive review of the evolution of search engines through the late 90’s. He discusses a number of different search-related topics, including the creation of BackRub, Bibliometrics and Citation Analysis, Eugene Garfield (the creator of the Science Citation Index), and what Impact Factor (IF) means, basically the average number of citations received from published science journals in a two-year period.

“Larry Page reasoned that the entire web was loosely based on the premise of citation and annotation. After all, what was a link but a citation, and what was the text describing that link but annotation?” – John Battelle, The Search

Link building is a never-ending task. Let’s look at a few strategies for building links.

Content Marketing and Guest Blogging

Create great, compelling, unique content, add in relevant links back to your site and send it out to relevant blog and website owners. Rae Hoffman-Dolan aka “Sugarrae” has a fantastic two-pronged guest blogging strategy, which she calls Horizontal and Vertical Guest Blogging.

Vertical Guest Blogging – Finding people in your industry, creating great content for them and incorporating a way to naturally include a link back to yourself.
Example: I run an auto parts store. I find a blog on antique cars, and write a great article on how changing the parts on antique cars every 6 months helps the cars last longer, and end the article with a link back to the page on my site about classic car auto parts.

Horizontal Guest Blogging – Finding topics that aren’t in your industry or niche directly, but find a way to relate, incorporate your content and link back to yourself.
Example: I am a supplement and nutrition store owner and I’ve just imported a new super drug supplement from Eastern Europe. I’m promoting my new drug and creating guest blog content for it. I’ve already reached out to a number of supplement and nutrition blogs, and they’re sick of me guest posting for them all the time. Let’s say the drug helps prevent memory loss, increases focus, aids in muscle building and helps with creative thinking.

Now, I’ll target themes where I can work my keyword in:

  1. GMAT Study Blogs – An article titled “7 ways to prevent memory loss while studying for the GMAT”. Include 6 proven memory loss prevention, and make the 7th tip a few sentences on your new supplement.
  2. Video Game Websites – Create a comprehensive list of 100 foods, drinks, exercises, supplements and stimulants that increase your focus for intense gaming sessions. Include your drug as one of the list items, as well as a link.
  3. Music Blogs – Write a post on 7 musicians and how they inspire themselves creatively. You include a number of tactics, including long walks on the beach, painting, and your new supplement (with a link of course!).
  4. Weight Lifting Blogs – An article on 15 proven ways to gain muscle fast, including the use of your new supplement.

More great blog content ideas:

  1. Writing a “how-to” walk-through guide
  2. Patch together a number of different strategies into one post (what do you think you’re reading? :) )
  3. Develop a top 7, top 10, top 50, top 100 list
  4. Write something controversial
  5. Debunk a myth

 

Blog Commenting
Find relevant blogs, contribute to the conversation, place a link back to your site. Don’t worry as much about no-follow/do-follow, just contribute to relevant topics, and mention your site in a way that helps the reader. If you’re interested in do-follow blog comments (don’t over-do it): A Massive List of 1,000 “Dofollow” Blogs

 

Testimonials
Write down all the products, services or tools you’ve used in the last 3 months that you really liked. Contact them, give them a great review/testimonial, and don’t forget to include a link to your site in it.

Linking Out
Many people seem to be very stingy with their linking, particularly when it’s a competitor that’s creating great content. I can understand the issues around this with large enterprises and fortune 500 companies, but I feel like most personal sites and small companies should freely link as much as possible. Creating a “resource” for your users is a great way to link out, as well as a way to signal to major search engines which kind of “link neighborhood” you’re in.

Asking Your Customers
If you have customers you’re close with, talk about link opportunities! Even if you’re not in the exact same vertical, there are always ways to find chances to link to each other. I’m a huge fan of leveraging offline relationships for my link building plans.

Advanced Search Parameters for Link Building
Find websites that are asking for guest bloggers

  • Keyword + intitle:“write for us”
  • Keyword + intitle:“contribute to”
  • Keyword + intitle:“submit” + inurl:blog

Find websites that have a large number of guest posters already

  • inpostauthor:guest + keyword
  • inpostauthor:”guest blog” + keyword
  • inpostauthor:”guest post” + keyword

Find college clubs (with .edu domains) for linking opportunities

  • inurl:.edu keyword club
  • inurl:.edu keyword group
  • inurl:.edu keyword organization

Find university resource lists

  • inurl:.edu helpful sites + keyword
  • inurl:.edu keyword + resources
  • inurl:.edu useful sites + keyword

Find non-profits that accept donations (and put links to donors!)

  • inurl:.org donors + keyword
  • inurl:.org supporters + keyword
  • inurl.org contributors + keyword

Find country-specific links “keyword + inurl:cc.tld”
Create a contest intitle:submit your contest

 

Link Building Resources

Point Blank SEO – Complete List of Link Building Tactics

The single best resource I have ever seen on link building tactics, from Jon Cooper.

Backlinko – Link Building Strategies

Another incredible resource on link building by Brian Dean.

Ahrefs

My personal favorite. The best link analysis tool in the industry. Their link database seems to be the largest, and the way you can cut the link data is extremely comprehensive.

Majestic SEO

Another link analysis tool. My second favorite tool in the link building industry.

Link Research Tools

Another link analysis tool.

Open Site Explorer

Another link analysis tool.

 

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  • January 2, 2018
  • SEO

The 2018 Site Migration SEO Checklist

I was recently asked about the SEO implications of migrating to a new domain. This can be scary! If you do a migration incorrectly, there’s definitely a chance of losing a significant amount of traffic. With that said, I know plenty of people that have done successful migrations. Let’s cover the big ones, so you can get back to what you do best. Business.

Ha Ha - Business!

The 2018 Site Migration SEO Checklist

Check off items as you go along.

 Use Screaming Frog, or a similar crawl tool, to get a comprehensive list of your URLs. A tool like this will definitely show you URLs you didn’t know you have. This is your survey of the universe. Export these URLs to a new sheet in Google sheets and call it “All URLs”
 Export the “Top Pages” report in Google analytics, paste them into a second tab of the Google sheet and call it “Top URLs”
 Use a link analysis tool like Ahrefs.com to sort your pages by links. Ahrefs calls this “Best by Links” under the “Pages” tab. Paste them into a third tab of the Google sheet.
 You now have 3 tabs. All your URLs. Your top URLs by traffic. Your top URLs by links.
 Compress all of this data into just 3 columns. Your URLs, the traffic over the last 30 days, and if you’re using Ahrefs, the link score (you could also use “total linking root domains” as a link metric if you’re using another tool – that works too). Your file might now look something like this:

Link Migration

 

 Once you have this, add filters to it, decide if you want to 301 it, 404 it, or something else. Mark it down in the sheet and write down the URL you want to point it to. It might look something like this:

 

Google Sheet Migration Checklist

 

Setup the new site. You can use robots.txt to block search engines from indexing your new site until you’re ready. Make sure to remove this when you actually launch, ya bozo.
 301 redirect your old stuff to your new stuff!
 Double check and make sure that users and bots are actually being redirected when they hit the old URL. You can use a tool like Browseo to test.
Make sure to remove canonical tags on the new domain that are pointing back to the old domain, and make them self-referencing canonical tags.
Evaluate live pages and your new XML sitemap with the Google Search Console “Fetch and Render” feature to spot any additional bugs.
 Once your new site has all the content moved up, and you’re ready to migrate, use the “Change of Address” feature in Google Search Console to let Google know you’re on the move.

Change of URL
 Make sure to re-create your XML sitemap for your new domain. Test both your old sitemap and new sitemap heavily before submitting to Google. You want to make sure every URL in your old sitemap is correctly doing a 301 redirect to your new pages. Once both your old and new sitemap are error free, submit both to Google Search Console. There are lots of tools to help you create sitemaps in WordPress. If you’re not using WordPress, checkout xml-sitemaps.com.
Watch for 404s, crawl errors, number of indexed pages, organic and referral traffic on the new domain.
 Do outreach for your links. If you can get people to update their content and link to your new URL, great. This is generally seen as better than a 301 redirect, even with Google’s announcement that 301 redirects now pass 100% of the link value.
 Throughout this entire process, be sure to keep an eye out for any easy optimizations you can grab related to missing, duplicate, or under-optimized:

  • Title tags
  • Meta descriptions
  • Headings
  • Canonicals
  • Broken links
  • Img ALT tags
  • Schema markup
  • Robots.txt
  • Site speed
  • Crawl & server errors
 

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  • January 2, 2018
  • SEO

How to Get Massive SEO Intelligence with Google Search Operators

One of my favorite things about SEO is that the little guy always has a fighting chance against big companies – it’s a leveled playing field.

It doesn’t matter if you don’t have a large budget or expensive tools. If you are smart enough, willing to put in the effort and use the right tools, you can beat anyone at SEO.

That’s where Google’s Advanced Search Operators come into play.

What is an advanced search operator?

These are symbols and expressions you can use within your search query to refine the results you get from Google. These operators are typically used by power users to perform in-depth research.

They are super valuable from the SEO perspective as well. By learning how to use advanced search operators properly, you can:

  • Get insight into your competitors’ SEO strategy.
  • Find link building opportunities.
  • Estimate market size and competitiveness.
  • Make decisions about your content marketing strategy.

All of it for free! No need to pay for expensive research tools.

In this short lesson, I will show you exactly how to use the most powerful operators.

Transcription:

I want to talk about advanced search operators.

These are some of the tools we can use to refine our searches to really dive into specific things. They’re for power users. They’re incredibly valuable from a link-building perspective. And they’re just helpful as a user.

When you understand these, you can find the answer way, way faster.

I’ve gotten into this debate with a bunch of people before. Life is no longer about knowing the answer. It’s about being able to find the answer. If you can get a really good handle on advanced search operators, you can utilize Google and other search engines to find stuff much quicker.

So, let’s dive into some of them next.

Quotes (“”)

If you surround your term with quotation marks, you get documents that contain exactly that term. Below, I’ve done a search for “Tommy Griffith” and I’m only got documents that have exactly the term Tommy Griffith in them.

Search operators - quotation marks

 

This can often be helpful for terms that have individual words that have a ton of high volume. Maybe something like “carnival cruise.” Instead of carnivals and cruise, I get only documents containing the term carnival cruise.

If you’re looking for a specific phrase that’s in exactly that order, you can get there with the advanced search operator quotation mark.

OR

You can use OR to return documents that have one or the other term. For example, “Carnival cruise” OR “disney world”.

This is the same concept as with quotations, but all of these documents have either carnival cruise or Disney World in them. By using the OR operator, you can get both.

Minus (-) and Plus (+) signs

Minus (-) and plus (+) signs allow you to remove documents that contain a word or force Google to add a word when they might normally remove it.

For example, Tommy Griffith is also a baseball player from the ’20s. If I wanted to search myself but remove any documents that contain the word baseball, I might add the minus sign.

The plus operator is useful because sometimes Google will remove filler words. If you want to add a term like and, you can do that with plus operator.

site:

If you want to see all of the documents in a domain, you can do that with site:

If search for something like site:www.courseminded.com, I will get all of the URLs on this domain.

You can also combine it with other operators, like quotations. For example, site:twitter.com “paleo” would show me only documents on twitter.com where people mentioning paleo.

link:

What the link: operator will do is return a sample of links to your site that Google knows about.

Now, I should mention that it’s not a comprehensive list of links, which is why I don’t find myself using it all. If I want to find links, I like to use third-party tools instead, something like Ahrefs or Majestic SEO.

However, you can still use link: to get an idea of what’s going on.

If I type something like link:www.clickminded.com, Google will show me all the links to my site.

Now, the result above is also showing me links on my own site, internal links. I might want to try something like link:www.clickminded.com -clickminded.com to find links to ClickMinded, but not ones on my own site.

Again, not comprehensive, but it’s an okay way to start.

intitle: and allintitle:

This is an advanced search operator that will return documents that have at least one of your terms in the title, while the other one can be in the document itself.

If I search for something like intitle:”SEO training” “link building”, this will show me things that have either SEO training in the document and link building in the title, or SEO training in the title and link building in the document.

If you want to do just the title, you can do something like allintitle:”SEO training course”. This is like telling Google: “you have to have all of these terms in the title for this to work.”

The reason why the intitle: search operator is so powerful for SEO is that, as you know, title texts are one of the most important elements of on-page optimization. So intitle: allows us to really figure out how many documents out there are using our exact keyword in their title.

inanchor: and allinanchor:

Similar to intitle: and allintitle:, what these operators will do is allow us to find documents that have a link profile with an exact-matched term.

So, if we use this one allinanchor:”dog costumes”, Google will show us a bunch of documents that have links pointing to them with this term.

Let’s say we now want to look into the Party City page from the example above. We can take the URL, use the link: operators and use the minus sign operator to remove all internal links.

By using the link: operator and removing internal links for this URL that we know has links with “dog costumes” anchor text, we now have an index of URLs linking to this page with the anchor text we want.

This is a good example of using two different operators together to find the links that you’re looking for. allinanchor: is very powerful in that sense.

inurl: and allinurl:

Similar to inanchor: and intitle:, inurl: and allinurl: help you just find a specific keyword in the url.

For example, allinurl:”dog costumes” (we use a space here, but generally hyphens are used as spaces in URLs and you can use this term either with spaces or with hyphens.)

Just another way to find documents that have your keyword via the URL.

inpostauthor: and allinpostauthor:

Similar concept as the ones we’ve already discussed, but it helps you look for a person.

One interesting tactic that some people use is to use guest as the keyword.

This is saying “show me documents where the post author name is guest.” What this generally does is shows you opportunities where blogs allow for guest post authors (link building opportunity.)

intext: and allintext:

Pretty straightforward. Use intext: or allintext: with your keyword to find it in the body of the document.

For example, allintext:”travel to Australia” will show me all documents that have exactly that term in the body.

Wildcard (*)

You’re only going to use this if you’re missing part of the query.

A good use of this operator is when you’re searching for lyrics. So, something like “my milkshake brings all the * to the yard”.

If you don’t know a particular term, you can replace that term with a wildcard.

related:

If you use the related: operator, Google will just show you domains that it thinks are related to the one you used in the query.

For example, if I use related:www.clickminded.com, Google will render different domains that it thinks are related.

cache:

Pretty simple. Show the cache of the site.

For example, cache:www.clickminded.com redirects to webcache.googleusercontent.com and loads the older, cached version of the site.

filetype:

If you’re looking for a particular type of file, you can use this.

For example, the search filetype:pdf “dog costumes” only renders PDFs that contain that keyword.

 

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  • January 1, 2018
  • SEO

Free Alternatives to Yahoo Site Explorer

For a long time, I used Yahoo Site Explorer to check both my own inbound links and my competitor’s links. YSE has since shut down, but there are a few awesome free alternatives to Yahoo Site Explorer for backlinks that I like to use. I wanted to quickly show you some of them, and how they can be helpful, even if you already use an awesome paid tool like SEOMoz’s Open Site Explorer.

Tools to help find your competitor’s backlinks

Blekko

Blekko.com

Blekko is an awesome not-so-secret search engine for backlink research. Just type www.website.com /inbound into Blekko. It’s a great, super fast alternative link check. You can get even more SEO data with www.website.com /seo … It’s a very interesting tool that’s clearly built in functionality for SEOs. I’ve seen Rich Skrenta, the CEO of Blekko, speak at a conference. Seems like a real bright guy, plus you have to give props to anyone with the balls to try and take search engine market share from the big G. Here’s an interesting Search Engine Land article on Blekko, where they pride themselves on actually blocking over a million domains from their search index, blocking spam from getting in.

Blekko Search Engine

Exalead Search

Exalead Search

Honestly, I don’t know much about Exalead. Just that their backlink data is pretty damn good. Use link:www.website.com to grab the data.

Exalead Search

Regardless of how strong your current link analysis tool is, it never hurts to check if any of your competitors’ big links have fallen through the cracks. It’s worth spending the 15 minutes it’ll take you to demo all 3 of these.

 

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  • January 1, 2018
  • SEO

Google Keyword Research Tool Alternatives

Hey all! I mentioned a number of Google Keyword planner alternatives in the ClickMinded SEO training course.

This week I’ve been at the SMX West Conference in San Jose, and have been meeting a bunch of awesome people and learned some really interesting new tactics and strategies. On Wednesday, I sat in on a great session called “Beyond The Google Adwords Tool: Advanced Keyword Research Tactics”. The speakers included Cameron Cowan, Patricia Hursh, Ted Ives and Keri Morgret. While the session was designed primarily for paid search, there are always takeaways within organic search at these sessions. I always like to find alternatives to the Google keyword tool and found some great ones at this session.

University of Colorado Latent Semantic Analysis Tool – https://lsa.colorado.edu/

latent semantic understanding university of colorado

Ted Ives mentioned the University of Colorado Latent Semantic Analysis Tool. This is super old school and. at first glance, looks ridiculously complicated (ok, let’s be honest, it’s not intuitive at all, but it’s still pretty bad ass).

The first few sentences of the executive summary go as follows:

Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) captures the essential relationships between text documents and word meaning, or semantics, the knowledge base which must be accessed to evaluate the quality of content. Several educational applications that employ LSA have been developed: (1) selecting the most appropriate text for learners with variable levels of background knowledge, (2) automatically scoring the content of an essay, and (3) helping students effectively summarize material.

It basically finds relationships between keywords by scoring them against whether or not they appear in millions of documents, relative to other keywords. Using this in tandem with the Google Keyword Tool could be ridiculously helpful.

IMDB Advanced Search – https://www.imdb.com/search/title

imdb database advanced search

Keri Morgret had a fantastic presentation on negative keywords in Adwords and showed a number of examples of large companies doing a not-so-great job with their keyword saturation. It was astounding to me how many large Fortune 500 companies are just not doing it right.

Keri had an awesome strategy. She recommended using the IMDB Advanced Search to put your keywords into this tool to find movies, tv shows, and other forms of media that might be artificially spiking search volume with the “wrong intent”. Such a great idea! Simply export your keyword data, do you everything you normally do for keyword research, but then double check it with the IMDB tool, to make sure some old movie or tv show isn’t artificially boosting your numbers.

Yahoo Answers to find natural language – https://answers.yahoo.com/

yahoo answers

Keri also mentioned that Yahoo Answers is an incredibly easy way to find different variations on how people naturally speak. Type in your keyword and take a look at the way people not only use those keywords but use variations, different stems and descriptive words around those keywords.

Awesome takeaways! Really good presentations from all the speakers.

 

 

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  • January 1, 2018
  • SEO

Google Analytics Certified (GAIQ) in Only 4 Hours

A little while ago, I studied for, took and passed the Google Analytics Certification test for the ClickMinded SEO training course. I was able to pass after about 4 hours of studying.

With that said, I had been using Google Analytics for a few years. You need to get at least 56/70 questions correct for a passing grade of 80%. There are a ton of fantastic walkthroughs out there on how to pass this exam, but I felt that some of them were a little bit too wordy, and sort of trick you into over-preparing for it when you don’t really need to.

 
Ready? Here’s how I passed it after just an afternoon of studying:

Step 1
First, go to the Google Partners and click “Join Google Partners”. This can be the same as your Google login.

Step 2
Next, go to Google Analytics Academy and take all the lessons.
As today there are 3 different courses that are free and really helpful. They are:

  1. Digital Analytics Fundamentals
  2. Google Analytics Platforms Principles
  3. Ecommerce Analytics: From Data to Decision

Each course is taught by Justin Cutroni and consist of a walk-through guide and video. I would highly suggest you take all 3 courses – really great content. If you want to study above and beyond Google Analytics Academy, check out Avinash Kaushik.

Step 3
Once you’re done watching the videos, and you’ve taken notes and read through the practice problems once, go back to the Google Partner center and fire up the test. It will open up a browser that doesn’t let you escape, so make sure to open up a second browser, and include the following 5 tabs: Analytics Help Center, Google Analytics Academy, your Actual Google Analytics Account, and of course the big G itself.

Be careful because as soon as you start, you won’t be able to mark a question and/or to go back and check your answer. I also suggest getting familiar with the Analytics help center. Most of the answers can be found there.

Heads up! Once you start the test, you can’t pause, go back, or mark questions!

The test takes an hour and a half. I used up all the time. If you fail, you’ll have to wait 7 days before taking it again.

The certification is valid for 18 months, and you get a shiny new logo and another line on your resume.

 

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3,467 businesses use ClickMinded to massively increase their organic traffic and sales from search engines.

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...or checkout some of our favorite digital marketing tools for 2018.

 
  • January 1, 2018
  • SEO